Current projects

Agricultural buffer strip creation

Agricultural buffer strip creation

Dee District Salmon Fishery Board / James Hutton Institute / River Dee Trust

There has been a rolling programme of support for buffer strips (a vegetated area near a stream which helps protect it from the impact of adjacent land use). Buffer strips play an important role in protecting water quality and have become a very common conservation practice.

Buffer strips have been created in many areas of the catchment, with a rolling programme to increase coverage year on year. The most recent initiative is part of the Pearls in Peril project and aims to create 45km of new buffer strips in the middle Dee.

More Information...

Diffuse Pollution Priority Catchments

Diffuse Pollution Priority Catchments

Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA)

Diffuse Pollution Priority Catchments is a new programme of rural diffuse pollution work which started in March 2010 for the Scotland and Solway-Tweed river basin districts.

More Information...

Drain Campaign: Yellow Fish project and Drain Care Guide

Drain Campaign: Yellow Fish project and Drain Care Guide

Dee Catchment Partnership / Aberdeen Harbour Board / Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) / Aberdeen City Council

The Yellow Fish Project raises awareness of how our drains work, where they go and which things can do alot of harm if they go down the wrong (or any) drain. 

More Information...

Easing obstructions to fish migration

Easing obstructions to fish migration

Aberdeenshire Council / Dee DSFB / River Dee Trust

Since 2007, the Dee DSFB and Trust have eased or removed 27 manmade obstructions to fish migration from the River Dee's tributaries. The aim is to allow fish to gain access to their natural spawning grounds. In 2014, the largest manmade obstruction was bypassedby installing a fish pass to the face of the Culter dam and two weirs further upstream in the Culter tributary were also eased.

Logie Burn Restoration

Logie Burn Restoration

Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) / River Dee Trust

Historic meanders at the lower end of the Logie Burn have been restored. We are working in the upper Logie catchment to reduce diffuse pollution from forestry and agriculture.

More Information...

Managing Recreation Hotspot Areas

DCMP, Aberdeenshire Council, CNPA, National Trust for Scotland

Helping to enhance and protect areas of high recrational use:

Potarch, Cambus Suspension Bridge, Clunnie Flats and Linn of Dee

 

More Information...

Natural Flood Management

CNPA / James Hutton Institute / FCS / Forest Research

We are developing a range of techniques that use natural or semi natural engineering methods to slow the flow of water through the river system. These range from large scale tree planting in the uplands, attenuation features in agricultural areas and green infrastructure in urban areas.

More Information...

Partnership Seminars

Partnership Seminars

Dee Catchment Partnership

The fourth Dee Catchment Partnership Seminar Day was held at Douneside House (Tarland) on 11 November 2104. Around 40 delegates took part in a morning of presentations by partners, followed by an afternoon fieldtrip around buffer strips in the Tarland catchment.

More Information...

Pearls in Peril

Scottish Natural Heritage

'Pearls in Peril' (PIP) is an EU LIFE+ NATURE project co-funded by 22 organisations across Scotland, England and Wales.  This nationwide project is acting to safeguard important freshwater pearl mussel populations. The project run from 2012 to March 2017. In that time, a wide range of conservation measures have been created.  In the Dee catchment PIP has four components: establishing 75km of riparian woodland in the upper catchment; establishing 45km of agricultural buffer strips in the middle and lower Dee; removing channel engineering features from the main stem of the river; and a 'Pearls in the Classroom' education programme working with schools throughout the catchment to rasie awareness of the species.

More Information...

Pilot Catchment initiative

Pilot Catchment initiative

SEPA

SEPA is working in four catchments in Scotland (the Rivers Dee, South Esk, Glazert and Nith) to identify sites where channel morphology (the shape of the stream bed and banks) needs to improved.

The Dee is one of these 'Pilot Catchments' and work is underway at several sites.

On the Bo Burn between Old Mill of Hirn and Loch of Park, opportunities for channel restoration combined with natural flood management (NFM) have been assessed. Following the appraisal of this options work restoration plans are being designed.

Meanwhile, surveys of the Tarland, Leuchar and Gormack Burns have also identified opportunities for channel restoration/NFM and land managers have been consulted about these. The next step is to produce detailed designs and consult further with land managers about these.

More Information...

Raising awareness

Raising awareness

Dee Catchment Partnership

Raising awareness of key issues affecting the catchment is central to our work. Our activities range from talks and discussions to local groups to working with schools on Dee-related education programmes.

More Information...

Scottish Mink Initiative

Scottish Mink Initiative

Rivers And Fisheries Trusts of Scotland (RAFTS)/ Aberdeen University /Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH)

Scottish Mink Initiative is a community based Initiative as part of the Rivers and Fisheries Trusts of Scotland’s (RAFTS) Biosecurity and Invasive Non Native Species Programme, aiming to protect native wildlife by removing breeding American mink from north Scotland and the Highlands.

More Information...

Tarland demonstration catchment

Tarland demonstration catchment

James Hutton Institute

The Tarland sub-catchment has been the focus of a range of protection and restoration measures since 2002. A network of buffer strips covers much of the catchment.

More Information...

Think TANK

Think TANK

Dee Catchment Partnership

Think TANK is deisgned to raise awareness of the pollution that can be caused by poorly managed septic tanks and the need for tanks to be managed properly in accordance with the DCP Septic Tank Guide leaflet. Due to demand from all over Scotland and interest from Ireland, we have produced a UK version of our Septic Tank Guide which has been signed off by all four UK agencies with responsibilities for septic tanks and is available as UK guidance. It will shortly be available translated into Welsh.

 

 

More Information...

Upper Dee Morphological Improvements

Upper Dee Morphological Improvements

Aberdeenshire Council / Cairngorms National Park Authority / River Dee Trust / RSPB / Scottish Environment Protection Agency / Scottish Natural Heritage

The upper Dee has been affected by changes to the shape of its bad and banks in several areas. Waste materials (old cars, rubble and other waste) have been removed from a 60m section of riverbank and the bank reprofiled to be lower and more gently sloping. This will allow the floodplain to flood more often, and this will benefit habitats that have become too dry.

More Information...

Upper Dee Riparian Woodland Restoration

Upper Dee Riparian Woodland Restoration

River Dee Trust (Pearls in Peril project)

This is a hugely ambitious £2.4 million project to establish native trees over 50 kilometers of riverbank. As they grow, they will help to reduce water temperatures during the summer months in crucial salmon spawning and nursery areas, helping to safeguard salmon populations against climate change. 

More Information...

  • c/o James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH
  • T: 01224 395141
  • E: info@theriverdee.org